Diabetes medication can help with weight loss, research finds

Recent research has discovered that Semaglutide, an anti-diabetic drug used to treat type 2 diabetes, can help obese people lose weight as well.

Obesity is an unhealthy body fat deficiency or complex condition that raises the risk of a person’s health conditions such as heart disease, asthma, high blood pressure, and some cancers.

It also comes from bringing in more calories than from exercising and regular everyday tasks are burned.
In the clinical trial published in the New England Journal of Medicine on Wednesday, experts at Northwestern University in Chicago tested Semaglutide.

As an anti-obesity drug, at a much greater dosage. Also read: Facts about sickle cell anemia

The trial involved 1,961 people with an average weight of 105kg/16.5 stone and a body mass index of 38kg/m2 who were either overweight or obese.
In 16 countries across Asia, Europe, North America, and South America, the study took place at 129 sites.

Any patients took a 2.4 mg dose of the medication once a week with an injection under the skin during the 15-month experiment, whilst others obtained a placebo injection, with both classes put on lifestyle guidance.
The results showed that, compared to 2.6kg without the drug, participants lost an average of 15kg on Semaglutide.

Also, compared to 2 percent of those who did not, 32 percent of those who took the drug lost a fifth of their body weight.
The drug works by hijacking the appetite levels of the body and mimicking a hormone called GLP1, which is released after a filling meal is eaten.

Scientists believe the findings could mark a “new era” with even more therapies on the horizon in the treatment of obesity.

One of the UK researchers, Rachel Batterham, said losing weight would decrease the risk of heart disease, diabetes, and severe COVID-19.

“This is a game-changer in the amount of weight loss it causes. I have spent the last 20 years doing obesity research, up until now we’ve not had an effective treatment for obesity apart from bariatric surgery,” she told BBC.

It is understood that evidence from the study was submitted to the National Institute of Clinical Excellence (NICE), the European Medicines Agency (EMA), and the US Food and Drug Administration for regulatory approval as a treatment for obesity (FDA).

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